The 8th Norwegian Open offered very fast courses with amazing flow

The 8th Norwegian Open offered very fast courses with amazing flow

Jan Egil Eide started organizing the Norwegian Open, when, about 10 years ago: “The most important competition in Norway was our national championship. The surface was terrible and it was just bad for the sport. I started to think that what if we organized a competition of the competitors’ choice.”

Christoffer Endresen - perform better in competitions by using rituals

Christoffer works with agility handlers to support them in the mental game. “My focus is on the handlers and helping them reduce their fear and anxiety, and replacing it with joy and enjoyment of the sport and, at the same time, achieving a higher level of performance.”

We had a chance to talk with him about how rituals can help agility handlers perform better in competitions. He also shares his top 5 tips for improving the mental game.

Becky Sinclair: Do your dog justice - Do mental prep

Becky Sinclair: Do your dog justice - Do mental prep

A bit nervous to compete? Having a hard time concentrating? Is someone watching me and thinking I’m not good enough? Not good enough for my dog? There are so many different thoughts that can hold us back in competitions, and also in training. Mental aspects play a huge role in success. It’s, of course, easier to be self confident, when your dog is well trained, but, according to Becky Sinclair, the founder of the “Agility mental prep” group on Facebook, we should, nonetheless, work more on our mental skills to get better in agility.

Agility saves lives – the story of Angelica Prytz

Agility saves lives – the story of Angelica Prytz

Imagine that you’d suddenly get the flu, that just wouldn’t go away, and, instead, it would get worse and worse. Months and years would pass but instead of getting better, your muscles and joints would be sore and get cramps, your blood pressure would be high, and your body would just shut down. The pain would be so bad that you would pass out and you would lose your muscles, not being able to even brush your own hair. And doctors would keep saying that you would never get better. All this happened to young Angelica Prytz, who, until then, had been very active and loved life. Read how agility saved her life!